Poverty Study Key Findings: Poverty Overview

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Index of Poverty Study Sections (scroll to continue reading Poverty Overview section)
Introduction     Demographics      Poverty Overview      Income Insufficiency      
Concentrated Poverty     Employment      Income      Education      Immigration      Family Structure
Figure 1: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Geography, 2006-2015
  • As seen in Figure 1, the poverty rate for Forsyth County has generally increased between 2006 and 2015.
  • Forsyth County did not have a significantly higher poverty rate than the majority of the peer communities until 2012
  • Forsyth County had a higher poverty rate than the majority of peer communities from 2012 to 2014.
  • However, in 2015, Forsyth County’s poverty rate (about 18%) is not significantly different than majority of peer communities, but it remains higher than the poverty rate in 2006 and 2007.
Figure 2: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Geography, 2010-2014
  • Figure 2 shows the poverty rates between 2010-2014 for Forsyth County and its peer communities.
  • The 2010-2014 poverty rate of Forsyth County was higher than that of the majority of the comparison communities.
  • In 2011-2015, poverty rates of Forsyth County are still higher than peer communities except Roanoke.

Figure 3: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Age Group and Geography, 2010-2014
  • As seen in Figure 3, children have the highest rate of poverty in Forsyth County, but adults ages 18-64 have the greatest number of people in poverty.
  • Forsyth County children (under 18) and adults ages 18-64 have higher poverty rates than the majority of its comparison communities.
  • In Forsyth County, poverty among older adults (ages 65 and over) is not significantly higher than the comparison communities.
*Bars of a lighter color indicate no statistical difference compared to Forsyth County.
Figure 4: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Race/Ethnicity and Geography, 2011-2015
  • Figure 4 shows that poverty in Forsyth County is highest for Hispanic/Latino residents, followed by African American residents
  • Forsyth County has significant racial disparities in poverty.  Hispanic/Latino residents are more than four times as likely to be in poverty as White, non-Hispanic residents, and African American residents are about three times as likely.
  • While Hispanic/Latino residents have the highest percentage of residents in poverty, there is a greater number of African American residents living in poverty.
  • Hispanic/Latino poverty rates in Forsyth County are significantly higher than all the peer communities.
*Bars of a lighter color indicate no statistical difference compared to Forsyth County.
Figure 5: Percent of Residents Ages 18 to 64 in Poverty by Gender and Geography
  • Figure 5 shows the percentages of men and women in Forsyth County and peer communities living below the poverty threshold.
  • In Forsyth County, a higher percentage of women are in poverty than men.
  • Between 2011-2015 compared to peer communities, men have higher poverty rates than a couple of comparison communities, but women in Forsyth County have higher poverty rates than all of the comparison communities except for Lafayette County.
*Bars of a lighter color indicate no statistical difference compared to Forsyth County.
Map 1: Poverty Rates by Census Tract in Forsyth County, 2011-2015
  • Map 1 shows the percentages of people in poverty by census tract.
  • In Forsyth County, census tracts of high poverty are clustered together and are in more urbanized areas of the county. The same is true for the peer communities.
  • Higher rates of poverty fall within Winston-Salem city boundaries, with notable patch near outskirts of the county to the west.
  • Most of the areas of concentrated poverty are located around US-52.
*Some census tracts have estimated percentages with high levels of variance are not suited for all uses. Contact Forsyth Futures for details poverty rates for specific census tracts.
Introduction     Demographics      Poverty Overview      Income Insufficiency      
Concentrated Poverty     Employment      Income      Education      Immigration      Family Structure