Poverty Study Key Findings: Family Structure

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Index of Poverty Study Sections (scroll to continue reading Family Structure section)
Concentrated Poverty     Employment      Income      Education      Immigration      Family Structure
Figure 1: Percent of Households in Poverty by Family Type with Related Children Under 18 in Forsyth County, 2010-2014 
  • As is shown in Figure 1, female-headed households with children have higher poverty rates than households with children headed by single males and married couples. 
  • Households with children headed by single women are about four times as likely to be in poverty as those headed by married couples.

Figure 2: Percent of Households by Race/Ethnicity and Family Type with Related Children Under 18 in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
  • As Figure 2 illustrates, out of all African American headed households with children, more than half are single female-headed households, a much higher rate than for other race/ethnic groups.
  • Higher rates of single parent households in the African American community could contribute to higher poverty rates in this community.
*Data for African American single males and Hispanic/Latino single males has a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Figure 3: Percent of Households in Poverty by Race/Ethnicity and Family Type with Related Children Under 18 in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
  • Figure 3 shows that racial disparities persist regardless of family type, which suggests that family type is not the only factor contributing to poverty for minority residents.
  • Hispanic/Latino families with children in particular have the highest levels of poverty regardless of family structure.
*Data for married couples and single males for all races and African American and White, non-Hispanic married couples has a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Concentrated Poverty     Employment      Income      Education      Immigration      Family Structure