Poverty Study Key Findings: Education

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Concentrated Poverty     Employment      Income      Education      Immigration      Family Structure
Figure 1: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Educational Attainment in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
  • As Figure 1 indicates, poverty rates are correlated with education levels.

*Data for post secondary degree has high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution

Figure 2: Educational Attainment of Residents 25 and Over by Geography, 2014
  • As shown in Figure 2, in Forsyth County a greater proportion of residents over 25 have less than a high school diploma as their highest level of education than in the majority of peer communities. 
  • Residents with less than a high school diploma are more likely to be in poverty than residents with a higher level of education, which may be a factor contributing to poverty in Forsyth County.
*Bars of a lighter color indicate no statistical difference compared to Forsyth County.
Figure 3: Educational Attainment for Residents 25 and Over by Race/Ethnicity in Forsyth County, 2014
  • Figure 3 shows that Hispanic/Latino residents have lower levels of educational attainment than White, non-Hispanic and African American residents.
  • African Americans also have a lower percentage of residents with post secondary degree than White, non-Hispanic residents. 
  • Even though  more Hispanic/Latino residents have less than a high school diploma than African American residents, the poverty rate for both groups is similar.

Figure 4: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Educational Attainment and Race/Ethnicity in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
  • As Figure 4 demonstrates, racial disparities in poverty persist regardless of level of education, which suggests that education is not the only cause of disparities in poverty outcomes by race/ethnicity. 
  • Disparities in poverty outcomes, even when controlling for education, are so great that minority residents with high school diplomas have higher poverty rates than White, non-Hispanic residents without high school diplomas.

*Data for less than high school and post secondary degree has high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Concentrated Poverty     Employment      Income      Education      Immigration      Family Structure