Gender

 You are viewing the Gender section of the Forsyth County Poverty Study. Click here to return to the table of contents.
This section provides a brief summary of statistics by gender from the Forsyth County Poverty Study. Gender disparities exist in Forsyth County both in poverty and in various risk factors for poverty such as employment, education, family type, etc. This section provides a summary of analyses that examine risk factors that may contribute to the gender disparity in poverty rates.
There may be other factors that influence this disparity that Forsyth Futures did not study due to unavailable or limited data. For a list of the kinds of factors that  could not be included in this analysis click here. Additionally, some of the measurements used in the report have large margins of error, which makes measuring smaller differences between groups difficult; better data in some areas may produce different results. Multiple factors are relevant to gender disparities in poverty; therefore, no single factor can fully explain these disparities.

Important Links

Data 101
Data Glossary
Methodology
About this Study
Executive Summary
Key Findings

Core Concepts

  • Females are more likely to be single parents than males, and as single parents, are more likely to be in poverty than single-male parents.
  •  Females are more likely to be in poverty than males across all levels of educational attainment.
  • The poverty rate of unemployed females is considerably higher than that of unemployed males in Forsyth County, which suggests that unemployment affects females’ risk of poverty more than males’.
  • Gender disparities in poverty rates exist for each race/ethnicity, but these disparities are substantially larger for the Hispanic/Latino community than in other races/ethnicities.
Figure 1: Percent of Residents Ages 18-64 in Poverty by Gender in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
 As shown in Figure 1, females are more likely to be in poverty than males.
Figure 2: Percent of Households with Related Children under 18 in Poverty by Family Type in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
Females are more likely to be single parents than males, and are more likely to be in poverty as single parents.
  • All single-parent households are more likely to be in poverty than households headed by married couples with children, as is shown in Figure 2.
  • 75% of single-parent households are headed by women (for more information click here and see Figure 1). This disproportionate likelihood of being a single parent could put women at a higher risk of poverty.  
  • Single mothers face challenges that single fathers do not, such as limited financial resources due gender disparities in income to cover children’s expenses and lack of enforced child support from nonresidential fathers (1-3), which could contribute to the higher poverty rates for female-headed households shown in Figure 2.

Figure 3: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Gender and Educational Attainment in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
Figure 3 demonstrates that there is no evidence that the high poverty rate among females is related to levels of educational attainment. Females are more likely to be in poverty than males across all levels of educational attainment, and females are slightly more likely to have a post-secondary degree than males (for more information click here and see Figure 6).
Figure 4: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Employment Status and Gender in Forsyth County, 2014
Males and females have similar rates of unemployment (4), Figure 4 demonstrates that the poverty rate of unemployed females is considerably higher than that of unemployed males. This disparity suggests that unemployment affects females’ risk of poverty more than males’.
Data for employed male and female residents have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Figure 5: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Gender and Race/Ethnicity in Forsyth County, 2014
There are gender disparities in poverty rates in each race/ethnicity. Figure 5 indicates that these disparities are substantially larger for the Hispanic/Latino community than other races/ethnicities, suggesting that Hispanic/Latino women may experience more of  the risk factors examined in this section, or additional risk factors not examined in this section,  than other women; or that these risk factors have a stronger effect on them.
Amanjot Kaur
Amanjot Kaur is a Data and Research Analyst with Forsyth Futures. She performs scientific analysis with existing data, as well as reviews and analyzes evidence pertaining to Forsyth County community issues. She holds a Master's in Public Health with a concentration in Epidemiology from the University of North Texas Health Science Center, Texas and a Bachelor’s degree in Pharmacy. In her free time, Amanjot loves going on adventures.
If you have questions or comments about the data presented in this section, please contact Amanjot Kaur at Amanjot@ForsythFutures.org or by phone at 336.701.1700 ext. 109.

References

Literature References

  1. Picklesimer, P. (2015). Single mothers much more likely to live in poverty than single fathers, study finds. Retrieved from http://hdfs.illinois.edu/single-mothers-much-more-likely-live-poverty-single-fathers-study-finds
  2. Kirby, J. (n.d.). Single-parent families in poverty. Retrieved from http://www3.uakron.edu/schulze/401/readings/singleparfam.htm
  3. Mather, M. (2010). U.S. Children in single-mother families. [Issue brief]. Retrieved from http://www.prb.org/pdf10/single-motherfamilies.pdf
  4. Forsyth Futures analysis. Contact Amanjot Kaur at amanjot@forsythfutures.org for more information.

Tabular References

Figure 1,3: U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). American Community Survey 5-year Public Use Microdata [Data files from PUMS 5-year estimates for the years 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data/pums.html 
Figure 2: U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Poverty status in the past 12 months of families by household type by number of related children under 18 years: Table B17012 [Data files from ACS 5-year estimates for the years 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_5YR_B17012&prodType=table
Figure 4: U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Poverty status in the past 12 months of individuals by sex by employment status: Table B17005 [Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_1YR_B17005&prodType=table
Figure 5: U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). American Community Survey 1-year Public Use Microdata [Data files from PUMS 1-year estimates for the years 2014]. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data/pums.html