Family Type

You are viewing the Family Type section of the Forsyth County Poverty Study. Click here to return to the table of contents.
Family type looks at the types of relationships between related individuals living together. While factors such as employment and educational attainment have a stronger association with poverty, there is some connection between family type and poverty (1). Family type can also influence how easily a person moves into or out of poverty. Based on national research, children of divorced parents are less likely to earn more than their parents than children of married parents or children of a single parent who was never married (2).
The following section examines families with children in Forsyth County, as well as the connection between family type and poverty. Due to complexity of how the Census Bureau classifies families, this section exclusively examines families with children, not all families.  This section examines three categories of family type:
  •  married-couples with children
  • male householders, without wives present, with children
  • female householders, without husbands present, with children.
Due to limitations of the data, this report cannot distinguish between divorced parents, single parents who were never married, cohabiting couples, and homosexual couples.

Important Links

Data 101
Data Glossary
Methodology
About this Study
Executive Summary
Key Findings

Core Concepts

  • Single-parent households in Forsyth County are more likely to be in poverty than married-couple households with children.
  • More than half of the African American households with children are headed by females, a much higher rate than other race/ethnic groups.
  • Minority households (Hispanic/Latino households in particular) have higher poverty rates than White, non-Hispanic households,  regardless of family type, which suggests that family type is not the only factor contributing to racial disparities in poverty.
Figure 1: Percent of Households with Related Children under 18 by Family Type in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
Figure 1 shows that married-couple families with children in Forsyth County are about twice as common as female-headed households and more than seven times as common as male-headed households with children.
Figure 2: Percent of Households in Poverty with Related Children under 18 by Family Type in Forsyth County, 2010-2014

Figure 2 demonstrates that female-headed households with related children have higher poverty rates than households with children headed by males and married-couples.
Figure 3: Percent of Households with Related Children under 18 by Family Type and Location, 2010-2014


As shown in Figure 3, the percentage of married-couple families in Forsyth County is higher than in the majority of peer communities, and the percentage of female-headed households in Forsyth County is lower than in the majority of peer communities. This suggests that, while female-headed households in Forsyth County are at a higher risk of poverty, more of this type of household are probably not the reason that Forsyth County’s poverty rate is higher than that of the peer communities.
Data for Roanoke (munc.), VA for male-headed households have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Bars of a lighter color indicate no statistical difference compared to Forsyth County.
Figure 4: Percent of Households with Related Children under 18 by Race/Ethnicity and Family Type in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
As illustrated in Figure 4, out of all households headed by African-Americans with children, more than half are female-headed households, a much higher rate than for other race/ethnic groups. Higher rates of female-headed households in the African American community could contribute to higher poverty rates in this community.  
Data for African American and Hispanic/Latino male-headed households have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Figure 5: Percent of Households with Related Children under 18 in Poverty by Race/Ethnicity and Family Type Forsyth County, 2010-2014

Figure 5 shows that racial disparities in poverty persist regardless of family type, which suggests that family type is not the only factor contributing to racial disparities in poverty outcomes. Overall, minorities have higher levels of poverty than White, non-Hispanics.
Data for married-couple African American, White, non-Hispanic, and male-headed households have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Amanjot Kaur MPH, CPH
Amanjot Kaur is a Data and Research Analyst with Forsyth Futures. She performs scientific analysis for existing data, as well as reviews and analyzes evidence pertaining to Forsyth County community issues. She holds Master's in Public Health with a concentration in Epidemiology from the University of North Texas Health Science Center, Texas and a Bachelor’s degree in Pharmacy. In her free time, Amanjot loves going on adventures.
If you have questions or comments about the data presented in this section, please contact Amanjot Kaur at Amanjot@ForsythFutures.org or by phone at 336.701.1700 ext. 109.

References

Literature References

  1. Edin, K., & Kissane, R. J. (2010). Poverty and the American family: A decade in review. Journal of Marriage and Family: A Decade in Review, 72 (3), 460-479.
  2. DeLeire, T. & Lopoo, L.M. (2010). Family structure and the economic mobility of children. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2010/familystructurepdf.pdf

Tabular References

Figures 1-3:  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Poverty status in the past 12 months of families by household type by number of related children under 18 years: Table B17012 [Data files ACS 5-year estimates for the years 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_5YR_B17012&prodType=table
Figures 4(a), 5(a):   U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Poverty status in the past 12 months of families by family type by presence of related children under 18 years by age of related children (black or African American alone householder): Table B17010B [Data files ACS 5-year estimates for the years 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_5YR_B17010B&prodType=table
Figures 4(b), 5(b):    U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Poverty status in the past 12 months of families by family type by presence of related children under 18 years by age of related children (white alone, not Hispanic or Latino householder): Table B17010H [Data files ACS 5-year estimates for the years 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_5YR_B17010H&prodType=table
Figures 4(c), 5(c):   U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Poverty status in the past 12 months of families by family type by presence of related children under 18 years by age of related children (Hispanic or Latino): Table B17010I [Data files ACS 5-year estimates for the years 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_5YR_B17010I&prodType=table