Age

You are viewing the Age section of the Forsyth County Poverty Study. Click here to return to the table of contents.
This section provides a summary of statistics by age groups from across all sections of the Forsyth County Poverty Study. This Study has identified age disparities in poverty rates and in various risk factors for poverty in Forsyth County. Children and younger residents in Forsyth County are more likely to be in poverty than older residents, and age is a significant risk factor for poverty, even when considering all of the other factors that Forsyth Futures analyzed.
There may be other factors influencing this disparity that Forsyth Futures did not study due to unavailable or limited data. For a list of factors that Forsyth Future analysts could not include in their analyses click here. Additionally, some of the measurements used in the report have large margins of error, which made measuring smaller differences between groups difficult; better data in some areas may produce different results. There are multiple factors relevant to age disparities; therefore, no single factor examined in the Forsyth County Poverty Study can completely explain these disparities. This section uses analyses with slightly different age groups for different risk factors because data for identical age groups was not always available across risk factors. 

Important Links

Data 101
Data Glossary
Methodology
About this Study
Exectutive Summary
Key Findings

Core Concepts

  • Children under the age of 5 and young adults, ages 18 to 24, are disproportionately impacted by poverty in Forsyth County.
  • Younger residents and families with children tend to have lower incomes than their counterparts, potentially increasing their risk of poverty. About half of children live in families that could not afford their estimated expenses.
  • The unemployment rate for young residents, ages 16 to 34, is higher than any other age group in Forsyth County, putting them at an increased risk for poverty; young residents who are employed are disproportionately affected by poverty.
  • Younger workers are less likely to earn sufficient wages or have sufficient jobs than older workers.
  • Young residents in Forsyth County are more likely to rent their homes, which may indicate a lack of asset building that could increase their risk of future poverty.
Figure 1: Percent of  Residents in Poverty by Age in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
  • Figure 1 shows that children under the age of 5 and young adults, ages 18 to 24, are disproportionately impacted by poverty in Forsyth County.
  • The academic literature on poverty shows that growing up in poverty is associated with a number of negative outcomes for children including poor educational outcomes, poor health, and an increased risk of being poor as adults (1,2).
  • Age disparities in poverty in Forsyth County may be due, in part, to the fact that younger residents are more likely to be minorities than older residents (3). For more information, click here and see Figure 7.
Figure 2: Median Household Income by Age of Householder in Forsyth County, 2014
Figure 2 shows that the median household income for households headed by young residents, ages 15 to 24, is lower than those of households headed by any other age group in Forsyth County, which could contribute to higher poverty rates in this age group.
Data for the 15-to-24-year-old age group have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Figure 3: Median Household Income for Families with and without Children in Forsyth County, 2014
Families with children have a significantly lower median income than those who do not have children, as can be seen in Figure 3, which could contribute to children having higher rates of poverty than adults.
Figure 4: Income Insufficiency by Age in Forsyth County, 2014
Figure 4 demonstrates that half of children live in families that cannot cover estimated expenses.
  • Roughly four in five residents between 18 and 24 cannot cover their estimated expenses.
  • The particularly high income insufficiency rates for residents between 18 and 24 may be, in part, because this age group is more likely to be in single-person households than other age groups.  Expense estimates assume that single-person households live in their own 1-bedroom apartment; actual expenses may be lower for anyone who shares housing expenses. 
Figures 2-4 show that lower household income and higher rates of income insufficiency among families with children and young residents may contribute to the higher poverty rates of these residents in Forsyth County.
Figure 5: Unemployment Rate by Age in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
The unemployment rate measures the percentage of residents currently seeking employment. This excludes full-time students, stay-at-home parents, and other people not seeking work. 
The unemployment rate for young residents, ages 16 to 34, is higher than any other age group in Forsyth County, which could contribute to higher poverty rates in this age group.
Data for residents 65 and over have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.
Figure 6: Percent of Residents in Poverty by Employment Status and Age in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
Figure 6 demonstrates that there is no significant difference in the poverty rates by age of unemployed residents in Forsyth County. Among employed residents, the youngest, ages 16 to 24, are disproportionately affected by poverty; poverty rates for employed residents decrease with age.
Data for 16-to-24-year-old residents have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution. 
Data for residents 65 and over are excluded from analysis due to an extremely high level of variance.
Figures 5-6 show that young residents have higher unemployment rates than other age groups, as well as higher poverty rates when employed.

Figure 7: Homeownership by Age in Forsyth County, 2010-2014
Figure 7shows that Forsyth County residents between the ages of 45 and 54 are more likely to be homeowners. Younger residents are more likely to be renters, which could indicate a lack of asset building that could put them at risk for financial insecurity (4).
Amanjot Kaur
Amanjot Kaur is a Data and Research Analyst with Forsyth Futures. She performs scientific analysis with existing data, as well as reviews and analyzes evidence pertaining to Forsyth County community issues. She holds a Master's in Public Health with a concentration in Epidemiology from the University of North Texas Health Science Center, Texas and a Bachelor’s degree in Pharmacy. In her free time, Amanjot loves going on adventures.
If you have questions or comments about the data presented in this section, please contact Amanjot Kaur at Amanjot@ForsythFutures.org or by phone at 336.701.1700 ext. 109.

References

Literature References

  1.  Danziger, S.H. & Haveman, R.H. (2001). Understanding poverty. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP. 
  2. Hershbein, B. (2014). More education=delayed fertility=more mobility. Brookings. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/social-mobility-memos/posts/2014/08/12-education-fertility-mobility-hershbein
  3. Forsyth Futures analysis. Contact Christopher Webb at christopher@forsythfutures.org for more information.
  4. Cramer, R. & Shanks, T. (2014). The assets perspective: The rise of asset building and its impact on social policy. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Tabular References

Figure 1,3, 4:  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). American Community Survey 5-year Public Use Microdata [Data files from PUMS 5-year estimates for the years 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data/pums.html 
Figure 2:  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). American Community Survey 1-year Public Use Microdata [Data files from PUMS 1-year estimates for the years 2014]. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data/pums.html
 Figure 5, 6:  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Median income in the past 12 months (In 2014 inflation-adjusted dollars): Table S1903 [Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_1YR_S1903&prodType=table
Figure 7:  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2015). Tenure by age of householder: Table B25007 [Data files from ACS 5-year estimates for the year 2010-2014]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_5YR_B25007&prodType=table