Core Indicator: Educational Attainment

Education  plays a significant role in social mobility, the prevention of poverty, the ability for people to escape the conditions of poverty, and the reduction of crime rates.(1-4) Graduating from college or community college significantly increases the likelihood of an individual’s economic success.(3-6) 

Literature suggests that, post-secondary education plays an important role in upward mobility.(3) Post-secondary education is defined as education attained after high school. This includes but is not limited to: colleges, community colleges, and universities. The education indicator measures the percentage the population, 25-years-old and older, with at least an associate's degree.

While it is recognized that certificate programs are also important to a community, the data for such information is not currently available for analysis.

Dashboard: Educational Attainment in Forsyth County

Trend: Forsyth County and Peer Communities

Figure 1: Percent of Residents with an Associate’s Degree or Higher in Forsyth County as Compared to Peer Communities, 2006-2016

Forsyth County and Peer Communities

Figure 2: Percent of Residents with an Associate's Degree or Higher in Forsyth County as Compared to Peer Communities, 2016

Bars of lighter color are not significantly different from Forsyth County.

By Age

Figure 3: Percent of Residents with an Associate’s Degree or Higher by Age in Forsyth County, 2016

The percentages of residents with an associate’s degree or higher are not significantly different from each other for residents below 65 years of age.

By Race

Figure 4: Percent of Residents with an Associate’s Degree or Higher by Race/Ethnicity in Forsyth County, 2016

Data for Hispanic/Latino residents have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.

By Gender

Figure 5: Percent of Residents with an Associate’s Degree or Higher by Gender in Forsyth County, 2016


By Location

Figure 6: Percent of Residents with an Associate’s Degree or Higher by Census Tract in Forsyth County, 2011-2015

Data for individual census tracts can have high margins of error, which sometimes happens when measuring relatively small groups.  This map is intended to help identify patterns at a high level; please contact Amanjot Kaur at Forsyth Futuresfor data on specific census tracts.

Extended Analysis: Educational Attainment in Forsyth County

Core Concepts

  • A higher percentage of residents in Forsyth County have earned an associate’s degree or higher  than residents in most peer communities.
  • The percentage of residents with an associate’s degree or higher in Forsyth County increased by 5 percentage points between 2006 and 2016.
  • Older residents and racial/ethnic minorities are less likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than younger residents and White, non-Hispanic residents.  
Figure 1: Percent of Residents with an Associate's Degree or Higher in Forsyth County as Compared to Peer Communities, 2006-2016
  • Figure 1 shows  that the percentage of residents with an associate’s degree or higher in Forsyth County increased by 5 percentage points between 2006 and 2016.
  • The percentage of residents with an associate’s degree or higher in Forsyth County in 2009 was lower than most of the following years.
  • The percentage of residents with an associate’s degree or higher in Forsyth County was significantly higher than most peer communities from 2006 until 2016, except in 2009, 2010, and 2014.
Figure 2: Percent of Residents with an Associate's Degree or Higher in Forsyth County as Compared to Peer Communities, 2016
Figure 2 shows that about 43% of residents in Forsyth County have earned an associate’s degree or higher, which is more than in most peer communities.
Bars of lighter color are not significantly different from Forsyth County.

Figure 3: Percent of Residents with an Associate's Degree or Higher by Age in Forsyth County, 2016
As shown in Figure 3, the residents 65 years and older are less likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than residents in other age groups.

The percentages of residents with an associate’s degree or higher are not significantly different across age groups for residents below 65 years of age.

Figure 4: Percent of Residents with an Associate's Degree or Higher by Race/Ethnicity in Forsyth County, 2016
As shown in Figure 4, racial/ethnic minorities are less likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than White, non-Hispanic residents.
  • African American residents are about half as likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than White, non-Hispanic residents.
  • Hispanic/Latino residents are about a third as likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than White, non-Hispanic residents.
 
Data for Hispanic/Latino residents have a high level of variance and should be interpreted with caution.

Figure 5: Percent of Residents with an Associate's Degree or Higher by Gender in Forsyth County, 2016
Figure 5 shows that females are more likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than males.

Figure 6: Percent of Residents with an Associate's Degree or Higher by Census Tract, 2011-2015
Figure 6 shows that a higher percentage of residents have an associate’s degree or higher in western Winston-Salem, and residents immediately next to highway 52 in central Winston-Salem are less likely to have an associate’s degree or higher than residents in other parts of the county.
Data for individual census tracts can have high margins of error, which sometimes happens when measuring relatively small groups.  This map is intended to help identify patterns at a high level; please contact Amanjot Kaur at Forsyth Futures for data on specific census tracts.
Amanjot Kaur MPH, CPH
Amanjot Kaur is a Data and Research Analyst with Forsyth Futures. She performs scientific analysis with existing data, as well as reviews and analyzes evidence pertaining to Forsyth County community issues. She holds a Master's in Public Health with a concentration in Epidemiology from the University of North Texas Health Science Center, Texas and a Bachelor’s degree in Pharmacy. In her free time, Amanjot loves going on adventures.
If you have questions or comments about the data presented in this section, please contact Amanjot Kaur at Amanjot@ForsythFutures.org or by phone at 336.701.1700 ext. 109.

References

Literature References

  1. Haskins, R. (2011). Fighting poverty the American way. Anti-Poverty Programs in a Global Perspective: Lessons from Rich and Poor Countries, Social Science Research Center, Berlin, [Record of a Symposium]. June 20-21, 2011. Berlin, Germany.  Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/0620_fighting_poverty_haskins.pdf        
  2. Acs, G. (2011). Downward mobility from the middle class: Waking up from the American dream. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2011/middleclassreportpdf.pdf?la=en      
  3. Furchtgott-Roth, D., Jacobson, L., & Mokher, C. (2009). Strengthening community colleges' influence on economic mobility. Retrieved from http://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/files/Jacobson.pdf   
  4. Sharkey, P., Bryan, G. (2013). Mobility and the metropolis: How communities factor into economic mobility.  Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2013/mobilityandthemetropolispdf.pdf   
  5. Ross, C., & Wu, C. (1995). The links between education and health. American Sociological Review, 60(5), 719-745. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2096319
  6. Lochner, L. (2007). Education and crime.  Retrieved from http://economics.uwo.ca/people/lochner_docs/educationpolicycrime_nov12.pdf

Tabular References

Figures 1,2,5: U.S. Department of Commerce. (2017). Educational attainment: Table S1501 [Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2016]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_16_1YR_S1501&prodType=table
Figure 3: U.S. Department of Commerce. (2017). Sex by age by educational attainment for the population 18 years and over: Table B15001 [Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2016]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_16_1YR_B15001&prodType=table
Figure 4(a):  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2017). Sex by educational attainment for the population 25 years and over (black or African American alone):  Table B15002B [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2016]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_16_1YR_B15002B&prodType=table
Figure 4(b):  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2017). Sex by educational attainment for the population 25 years and over (white alone, not Hispanic or Latino): Table B15002H [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2016]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_16_1YR_B15002H&prodType=table
Figure 4(c):  U.S. Department of Commerce. (2017). Sex by educational attainment for the population 25 years and over (Hispanic or Latino):  Table B15002I [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2016]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_16_1YR_B15002I&prodType=table
Figure 6: U.S. Department of Commerce. (2016). Educational attainment: Table S1501 [Data files from ACS 5-year estimates for the year 2011-2015]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_15_5YR_S1501&prodType=table