Education / Academic Success / Reading Proficiency

 

Reading Proficiency

 

During the elementary and middle school years, students are learning basic reading and math skills. These skills provide the basis for children and young adults to acquire, process, and interpret information about the world. If students do not develop this foundation of basic skills, it can impact their academic success at all levels of education.1

From birth to about age eight, approximately third grade, children learn how to read. After third grade, reading increasingly becomes a key part of instruction and how children learn. Children who are unequipped with basic reading skills at the end of third grade are at much greater risk of falling behind in school.1

The measure used for Reading Proficiency is the reading test taken at the end of third grade. Proficiency on this test is defined as possessing the skills required to read at a third grade level.

The data dashboard below shows current and recent trend data for rates of reading proficiency in Forsyth County.

Dashboard: Students Meeting Third Grade Reading Proficiency

Understanding Students Meeting Third Grade Reading Proficiency Spatially

The map below visualizes the percentage of students meeting the third grade reading benchmark by elementary school zones across Forsyth County.

Key Point: The Percentage of Students Meeting Third Grade Reading Proficiency is Generally Decreasing

  • Students meeting third grade reading proficiency decreased by 5% over three years.

Key Point: Disparities Present Among Students Meeting Third Grade Reading Proficiency by Economic Status

  • In 2016-17, economically disadvantaged students were about half as likely to meet third grade reading proficiency as students who were not economically disadvantaged.
  • There is a significant and persistent disparity between third grade reading outcomes for both groups over three years.
  • The percent of students meeting third grade reading proficiency is decreasing for both groups; over three years, outcomes for economically disadvantaged students decreased by 5%, while outcomes for students who were not economically disadvantaged decreased by 10%.

Key Point: Disparities Among Students Meeting Third Grade Reading Proficiency by Gender

  • In 2016-17, males were 8% less likely to meet third grade reading proficiency than females.
  • Over three years, there is a persistent and significant disparity between between males and females.

Key Point: Disparities Present Among Students Meeting Third Grade Reading Proficiency by Race/Ethnicity

  • In 2016-17, African American students were about half as likely as white students to meet third grade reading proficiency; Hispanic / Latino students were less than half as likely to meet third grade reading proficiency than white students.
  • Over three years, there are persistent and significant disparities between all three groups.
Notes on Data

This report has been produced to support grant writing efforts. As such, the validity and reliability of the data in this report has not been rigorously statistically tested. Forsyth Futures does not support the use of this data for specific programmatic planning. If you are interested in using data from this report for more rigorous purposes, please contact info@forsythfutures.org for a consultation on how best to proceed.

Literature References
  1. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2010). EARLY WARNING! Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters.
Data Sources
  1. North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Accountability Services Division, Analysis and Reporting, 2016-17 State, District, and School Level Drilldown Performance Data Report. Retrieved from: http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/accountability/reporting/