Education / Academic Success / Preparation for College and Career

 

Preparation for College and Career

 

Colleges expect students to have the skills and knowledge to tackle college coursework. Students unprepared for college frequently spend time and money taking remedial courses, greatly decreasing their chances of success and degree completion.1

The American College Testing (ACT) assessment, which is taken by all 11th grade students in North Carolina, measures college readiness in Reading, Math, Science, and English. In North Carolina, proficiency on the ACT is considered to be a composite score of 17 or above – the minimum score required for admission into the UNC system.

The data dashboard below shows current and recent trend data for students meeting ACT proficiency in Forsyth County.

Dashboard: Students Meeting ACT Proficiency

Explore: Understanding Students Meeting ACT Proficiency Spatially

Key Point: Only 58% of all Forsyth County Students Met ACT Proficiency in 2016-17

Key Point: Disparities Present in ACT Proficiency Among Students by Economic Status

  • Economically disadvantaged students are less than half as likely to meet ACT proficiency than students who are not economically disadvantaged.
  • There is a persistent and significant disparity between ACT proficiencies for economically disadvantaged students and students who are not economically disadvantaged.

Key Point: Disparities Present in ACT Proficiency Among Students by Race/Ethnicity

  • In 2016-17, African American and Hispanic / Latino students were both less than half as likely to meet ACT proficiency as white students.
  • Over three years, there is a persistent and significant disparity in ACT proficiency among white students and both African American and Hispanic / Latino students.
Notes on Data

If you are interested in using data from this report for rigorous purposes, please contact info@forsythfutures.org for a consultation on how best to proceed.

Literature References
  1. Alliance for Excellent Education. (2011, May). Saving Now and Saving Later: How High School Reform Can Reduce the Nation’s Wasted Remediation Dollars. Retrieved from http://all4ed.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/SavingNowSavingLaterRemediation.pdf
Data Sources

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Accountability Services Division, Analysis and Reporting, 2016-17 State, District, and School Level Drilldown Performance Data Report. Retrieved from: http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/accountability/reporting/