Education / Academic Success / Post-Secondary Completion

 

Post-Secondary Completion

 

Education plays a significant role in social mobility, the prevention of poverty, the ability for people to escape the conditions of poverty, and the reduction of crime rates.1-4 Graduating from college or community college significantly increases the likelihood of an individual’s economic success.3-6

Literature suggests that, post-secondary education plays an important role in upward mobility.3 Post-secondary education is defined as education attained after high school. This includes but is not limited to: colleges, community colleges, and universities. The education indicator measures the percentage the population, 25-years-old and older, with at least an associate’s degree.

While it is recognized that certificate programs are also important to a community, the data for such information is not currently available for analysis.

The data dashboard below shows current and recent trend data for residents with a post-secondary degree in Forsyth County.

Dashboard: Residents with a Post-Secondary Degree

Understanding Post-Secondary Completion Spatially

The map below visualizes the percentage of residents with a post-secondary degree by census tract across Forsyth County.

Key Point: Percentage of Residents with a Post-Secondary Degree is Increasing

  • The percent of residents with a post-secondary degree increased 4 percentage points between 2007 and 2017.

Key Point: Similar Percentage of Residents with a Post Secondary Degree by Gender

  • 2014 was the only year in which females and males had significant difference in percentage of those with an associates degree or higher.

Key Point: Disparities Present in Percent of Residents with a Post Secondary Degree by Age

  • The percentage of residents 65 years and older with a post-secondary degree has risen 12 percentage points between 2008 and 2017.

Key Point: Disparities Present in Percent of Residents with a Post Secondary Degree by Race/Ethnicity

  • White, non-Hispanic residents are more likely to have a post-secondary degree as compared to African American residents and Hispanic/Latino residents.
Notes on Data

If you are interested in using data from this report for more rigorous purposes, please contact info@forsythfutures.org for a consultation on how best to proceed.

Literature References
  1. Haskins, R. (2011). Fighting poverty the American way. Anti-Poverty Programs in a Global Perspective: Lessons from Rich and Poor Countries, Social Science Research Center, Berlin, [Record of a Symposium]. June 20-21, 2011. Berlin, Germany. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/0620_fighting_poverty_haskins.pdf
  2. Acs, G. (2011). Downward mobility from the middle class: Waking up from the American dream. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2011/middleclassreportpdf.pdf?la=en
  3. Furchtgott-Roth, D., Jacobson, L., & Mokher, C. (2009). Strengthening community colleges’ influence on economic mobility. Retrieved from http://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/files/Jacobson.pdf
  4. Sharkey, P., Bryan, G. (2013). Mobility and the metropolis: How communities factor into economic mobility. Retrieved from http://www.pewtrusts.org/~/media/legacy/uploadedfiles/pcs_assets/2013/mobilityandthemetropolispdf.pdf
  5. Ross, C., & Wu, C. (1995). The links between education and health. American Sociological Review, 60(5), 719-745. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2096319
  6. Lochner, L. (2007). Education and crime. Retrieved from http://economics.uwo.ca/people/lochner_docs/educationpolicycrime_nov12.pdf
Data Sources

U.S. Department of Commerce. (2018). Sex by Age by Educational Attainment for the Population 25 and Over: Table B15002 [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2017]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_17_1YR_S1903&prodType=table

U.S. Department of Commerce. (2018). Sex by Age by Educational Attainment for the Population 18 and Over: Table B15001 [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2017]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_17_1YR_S1903&prodType=table

U.S. Department of Commerce. (2018). Sex by Age by Educational Attainment for the Population 25 and Over (Black or African American): Table B15002B [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2017]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_17_1YR_B15002B&prodType=table

U.S. Department of Commerce. (2018). Sex by Age by Educational Attainment for the Population 25 and Over (White Alone, Not Hispanic or Latino): Table B15002H [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2017]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_17_1YR_B15002H&prodType=table

U.S. Department of Commerce. (2018). Sex by Age by Educational Attainment for the Population 25 and Over (Hispanic or Latino): Table B15002I [ Data files from ACS 1-year estimates for the year 2017]. Retrieved from https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_17_1YR_B15002I&prodType=table