Health and Wellness / Infant Health

 

Infant Health

 

Infant health is often a leading indicator of not only children’s overall health, but also of a community’s health.1 One measure of infant health in a community is the percent of babies born at a low birthweight. Low birthweight is associated with factors such as maternal health, quality and access to medical care, socioeconomic conditions, exposure to air pollution, and public health practices.1 A baby is considered to be of low birthweight if they are born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces or 2500 grams. While some babies with low birthweight are healthy, it can cause serious health problems for others. A baby with low birthweight may have trouble eating, gaining weight, and fighting off infection.

The data dashboard below shows current and recent trend data for low infant birthweight in Forsyth County.

Dashboard: Percent of Low Birthweight of Infants

Rates of Low Birthweight of Infants by Age of Mother

  • There were no low birthweight babies born to mothers 45 years or older.

Rates of Low Birthweight of Infants by Race of Mother

  • 16% of babies born to African American mothers were low birthweight.

Rates of Low Birthweight of Infants by Educational Attainment of Mother

  • 8% of babies born to mothers with a Bachelor’s Degree were low birthweight.
Notes on Data

This report has been produced to support grant writing efforts. As such, the validity and reliability of the data in this report has not been rigorously statistically tested. Forsyth Futures does not support the use of this data for specific programmatic planning. If you are interested in using data from this report for more rigorous purposes, please contact info@forsythfutures.org for a consultation on how best to proceed.

Literature References
  1. Kim, D., Saada, A. (2013). The Social Determinants of infant Mortality and Birth Outcomes in Western Developed Nations: A Cross-Country Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 10:2296-2335.
Data Sources

NCDHHS Baby book